There are approximately 400 different theme parks in America that cater to more than 335 million visitors every single year. This includes parks with mechanical coasters and of course water parks. While the amusement park is certainly an American pastime, it is not without its perils. According to a study from Nationwide Children’s hospitals, 4,423 children are treated at the hospital annually for amusement park-related injuries.

There are obviously many different reasons for this, but the bottom line is that amusement park safety should be at the forefront. Therefore, it is very important for us to have individuals attending industrial maintenance training and learning to maintain these rides properly.

A Call for Larger Rides

We are seeing plenty of accidents but surprisingly, this does not deter the public’s appetite for greater thrills. We are now seeing people demanding faster, taller, and even larger rides. Naturally, engineers will comply with these demands, but the question remains how to keep them safe. The control systems that are designed for these rides are very complex, and while there was a time when they could be controlled by a computer, that time has passed. There are far too many things that can go wrong, and the need for industrial maintenance technicians is higher than ever before.

Protective Systems

SchoolPondThere are systems in place that will serve to ensure the ride functions smoothly and the riders are not injured in the process. It some cases it can seem like a bit of a tall order given the nature of these amusement park rides, but there are skilled engineers who are able to create a safer environment for the riders. Some of the safety systems in place include:

* Block Zone Systems – These keep the vehicles from colliding; for example, they could disable a propulsion system, halting the vehicle entirely.

* Single/Multi-Point Failure Analysis – This analysis is constantly performed on the ride in question, checking the hardware, software, and finally, the mechanics.

* Failure Modes/Effect Analysis – This is only performed in the event something goes wrong so that the technician will be able to examine the issue and potentially correct it.

Admittedly, the leading cause of amusement park injuries today is rider misconduct. It should also be noted that major accidents happen on roller coasters and whirling rides on a more consistent basis than with any other ride. Many riders are not properly buckled in, and in most cases, they are not following the rules. For example, they may lean or stand up when it is ill-advised. If you take these instances out, however, you will quickly find that there are still plenty of incidents that happen due to mechanical failure. This is where you come in.

Entering the Field of Industrial Maintenance

Amusement parks need industrial maintenance just as much as any other type of facility. The difference is that instead of products being produced properly, you are dealing with the preservation of human life. It might sound like it is all fun and games, but this is a job that absolutely must be taken seriously. If you are ready to take on the challenge, then now would be a great time for you to start checking into your educational options.

Your Educational Options

ITI Technical College offers comprehensive instrumentation technology training that will get you ready to enter the industry at your leisure. There is a lot to learn, but we can give you access to highly experienced instructors and hands-on training that will prepare you for the world you are about to enter. If you are ready, give us a call and find out what you need to get started. We offer advanced training from instructors with real industry experience. Do not let budget constraints dissuade you from contacting us – financial aid is available to those who qualify. Expand your horizons and your career!

 

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